Friday Finds – September 13, 2013

Posted: September 13, 2013 in Friday Finds

Friday Finds is a weekly event hosted by Should Be Reading, where you can discuss books that you’ve discovered over the course of the week and added to your To Be Read (TBR) list. They can be books that are new or used.  They can be ones that you’ve borrowed (library or friend), found online, heard about from a friend, etc.

Here are my finds for the week.  All have been sitting sadly on my shelf waiting to be read except for What Alice Forgot which is a new purchase.

alice

From the Goodreads:   Alice is twenty-nine. She is whimsical, optimistic and adores sleep, chocolate, her ramshackle new house and her wonderful husband Nick. What’s more, she’s looking forward to the birth of the ‘Sultana’ – her first baby.

But now Alice has slipped and hit her head in her step-aerobics class and everyone’s telling her she’s misplaced the last ten years of her life.

In fact, it would seem that Alice is actually thirty-nine and now she loves schedules, expensive lingerie, caffeine and manicures. She has three children and the honeymoon is well and truly over for her and Nick. In fact, he looks at her like she’s his worst enemy. What’s more, her beloved sister Elisabeth isn’t speaking to her either. And who is this ‘Gina’ everyone is so carefully trying not to mention?

Alice isn’t sure that she likes life ten years on. Every photo is another memory she doesn’t have and nothing makes sense. Just how much can happen in a decade? Has she really lost her lovely husband forever?

nanny

From the Publisher:  Struggling to graduate from NYU and afford her microscopic studio apartment, Nanny takes a position caring for the only son of the wealthy X family.  She rapidly learns the insane amount of juggling involved to ensure that a Park Avenue wife, who doesn’t work, cook, clean, or raise her own child has a smooth day.

When the X’s marriage begins to disintegrate, Nanny ends up involved way beyond the bounds of human decency or good taste.  Her tenure with the X family becomes a nearly impossible mission to maintain the mental health of their four-year-old, her own integrity, and, most important, her sense of humor.  Over nine months, Mrs. X and Nanny perform the age-old dance of decorum and power as they test the limits of modern-day servitude.

rose

From Goodreads:  The year is 1327. Franciscans in a wealthy Italian abbey are suspected of heresy, and Brother William of Baskerville arrives to investigate. When his delicate mission is suddenly overshadowed by seven bizarre deaths, Brother William turns detective. His tools are the logic of Aristotle, the theology of Aquinas, the empirical insights of Roger Bacon—all sharpened to a glistening edge by wry humor and a ferocious curiosity. He collects evidence, deciphers secret symbols and coded manuscripts, and digs into the eerie labyrinth of the abbey, where “the most interesting things happen at night.”

havana

From the Publisher:  In 1962, Carlos Eire was on of 14,000 children airlifted out of Cuba – exiled from his family, his country, and his own childhood by the revolution.  The memories of Carlos’s life in Havana, cut short when he was just eleven years old, are at the heart of this stunning, evocative, and unforgettable memoir.

Waiting for Snow in Havana is both an exorcism and an ode to a paradise lost.  For the Cuba at Carlos’s youth – with its lizards and turquoise seas and sun-drenched siestas – becomes an island of condemnation once a cigar-smoking guerrilla named Fidel Castro ousts President Batista on January 1, 1959.  Suddenly the music in the streets sounds like gunfire.  Christmas is made illegal, political dissent leads to imprisonment, and too many of Carlos’s friends are leaving Cuba for a place as far away and unthinkable as the United States.  Carlos will end up there, too, and fulfill his mother’s dreams by becoming a modern American man – even if his soul remains in the country he left behind.

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Comments
  1. bookmammal says:

    I read The Nanny Diaries when it first came out and really liked it–especially the theme of the “high-stakes” world of elementary school admissions, which would have been funny, except I know there are many parents who act that way in “real life”. Unfortunately, I never liked any of the later books that these authors co-wrote together–but I did enjoy this one very much!

  2. What Alice Forgot looks excellent – another one for me! … and it’s by Lianne Moriarty who wrote The Husband’s Secret which I really, really enjoyed…. Thank you so much!

  3. Cautious Reader says:

    I really enjoyed The Nanny Diaries. Umberto Ecco is on my list !

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