Friday Finds – August 23, 2013

Posted: August 23, 2013 in Friday Finds

Friday Finds is a weekly event hosted by Should Be Reading, where you can discuss books that you’ve discovered over the course of the week and added to your To Be Read (TBR) list. They can be books that are new or used.  They can be ones that you’ve borrowed (library or friend), found online, heard about from a friend, etc.

Below are finds that I found in my local library on sale for .25 cents (with the exception of The Messenger – which is a library book)!  Who can resist that?  I figure if they don’t turn out all that good, I can donate them back to the library with minimal damage to my bank account!

templar

From the Publisher:   The ancient order of the Knights of Templar possess untold wealth and absolute power over kings and popes…until the Inquisition, when they were wiped from the face of the earth, their hidden riches lost.  But now two forces vying for the treasure have learned that it is not at all what they thought it was – and its true nature could change the modern world.

hard

From Goodreads:  Just days after marrying Sheriff Paul Davidson, Anna Pigeon moves to Colorado to assume her new post as district ranger at Rocky Mountain National Park. When two of three children who’d gone missing from a religious retreat reappear, Anna’s investigation brings her face-to-face with a paranoid sect–and with a villain so evil, he’ll make the hairs on the back of your neck stand on end.

children

From Goodreads:  Painstakingly restored from Tolkien’s manuscripts and presented for the first time as a fully continuous and standalone story, the epic tale of The Children of Hurin will reunite fans of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings with Elves and Men, dragons and Dwarves, eagles and Orcs, and the rich landscape and characters unique to Tolkien. There are tales of Middle-earth from times long before The Lord of the Rings, and the story told in this book is set in the great country that lay beyond the Grey Havens in the West: lands where Treebeard once walked, but which were drowned in the great cataclysm that ended the First Age of the World.

messenger

From the Publisher:  Ed Kennedy is an underage cabdriver without much of a future.  He’s pathetic at playing cards, hopelessly in love with his best friend, Audrey, and utterly devoted to his coffee-drinking dog, the Doorman.  His life is one of peaceful routine and incomplete until he inadvertently stops a bank robbery.  That’s when the first ace arrives in the mail.  That’s when Ed becomes the messenger.  Chosen to care, he makes his way through town helping and hurting (when necessary) until only one question remains:  Who’s behind Ed’s mission?

peak

From Goodreads:  After Peak Marcello is arrested for scaling a New York City skyscraper, he’s left with two choices: wither away in Juvenile Detention or go live with his long-lost father, who runs a climbing company in Thailand. But Peak quickly learns that his father’s renewed interest in him has strings attached. Big strings. He wants Peak to be the youngest person to reach the Everest summit–and his motives are selfish at best. Even so, for a climbing addict like Peak, tackling Everest is the challenge of a lifetime. But it’s also one that could cost him his life. Roland Smith has created an action-packed adventure about friendship, sacrifice, family, and the drive to take on Everest, despite the incredible risk. Peak is a novel readers won’t be able to put down.

well

From Goodreads:  He grew up on the street, a high school dropout. In 1938 he left his mother and sister behind in Vienna and fled on foot to France, where later he was put on a train to Auschwitz. Transported from camp to camp, Fred Wander was haunted for twenty-five years by the crystalline, episodic stories that chronicle the plight of his fellow inmates. Only after the tragic death of his little daughter did these voices pour forth. The result was this novel, published in East Germany in 1970. Finally it appears in English in this masterful translation, its haunting cadences evoking Levi and Celan, its back-story as heartrending as Suite Française. Wander demonstrates that the survival of a single man is a collaborative enterprise. The Seventh Well, named after the well of truth, recalls Dante’s Inferno with its mesmerizing descent into evil. Its existence is a miracle.

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Comments
  1. That is quite an eclectic list! They sound awesome. Hope you enjoy. Thanks for stopping by my site

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